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Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

Colonel Eh Taylor Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

Col. E.H. Taylor, Jr. Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon | Bourbon Brothers Review # 167

Colonel E.H. Taylor Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon – For Sale and Delivered Worldwide

On April 2, 2006, a storm with tornado strength winds ripped through Kentucky, tearing apart two of Buffalo Traces warehouses. One was empty, the other Warehouse C was full of 24,000 barrels of then-young, far-from-release E.H. Taylor Bourbon.

The Warehouse sustained significant damage to its roof and north brick wall, exposing a group of aging bourbon barrels to the Central Kentucky climate during the summer while the roof and walls were repaired. This lead to increased wood interaction in the barrels and a rich concentration of flavor in the spirit.

In 2011, the whiskey from the top two rows of Warehouse C were bottled as a special release with an unusual name: Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon. The whiskey inside is a rye-heavy mash. The barrels were aged between 9 years, 8 months and 11 years, 11 months. The Bourbon was bottled in bond at 100 proof.

Due to the weather the spirit had a high rate of evaporation and just 93 barrels, located on the top two floors of the facility, were selected and married into this single batch whiskey.

Tasting notes jam-like fruit, vanilla, dark spick and a touch of smoke.

DISTILLERY: BUFFALO TRACE

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This offering is from a selection of 93 special casks that were housed in Buffalo Trace Distillerys landmark Warehouse C. Struck by a massive tornado in April of 2006, the warehouses nearly 24,000 barrels were left exposed to the natural elements. Buffalo Trace decided to bottle these barrels separately, as the sweltering Kentucky heat had accelerated the aging process, creating a distinct flavor.

Eh Taylor Jr Warehouse C Tornado Surviving

On Sunday evening, April 2, 2006, a severe storm with tornado strength winds tore through Central Kentucky, damaging two Buffalo Trace Distillery aging warehouses. One of the damaged warehouses was Warehouse C, a treasured warehouse on property, built by Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. in 1885. It sustained significant damage to its roof and north brick wall, exposing a group of aging bourbon barrels to the elements. That summer, the exposed barrels waited patiently while the roof and walls were repaired, meanwhile being exposed to the Central Kentucky climate. When these barrels were tasted years later, it was discovered that the sun, wind, and elements they had experienced created a bourbon rich in flavors that was unmatched. This was truly a special batch of barrels, and though the Distillery does not hope for another tornado, it feels lucky to have been able to release this once in a lifetime product.

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Review: Col Eh Taylor Jr Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

On April 2, 2006, a storm ripped through Kentucky, tearing apart two of Buffalo Traces warehouses. One was empty. One, Warehouse C, was full of 24,000 barrels of then-young, far-from-release E.H. Taylor Bourbon.

The walls and roof were ripped open, but the whiskey survived. But this did expose the barrels inside to the elements , which stayed there for months while repairs were made.

In 2011, the whiskey from the top two rows of this warehouse was bottled as a special release with an unusual name: Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon. The whiskey inside is a rye-heavy mash. The barrels were aged between 9 years, 8 months and 11 years, 11 months. The Bourbon was bottled in bond at 100 proof.

Sadly, Ive no original Taylor to compare this release to, but its a powerful whiskey in its own right: Fragrant from the moment its poured with deep citrus and pure, spicy rye character. The body is full, the color deep amber. The palate is amazingly enjoyable for a Bourbon this old and roughly-treated. Plenty of citrus atop a creme brulee body, the rye less powerful here than on the nose. Superb balance. The finish is warm , but easier than youd think. Lovely wood tones and flamed orange peel round it out. Probably the best Taylor of the three bottlings released so far.

100 proof.

Out Of Disaster Luxury: Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

The Colonel E.H. Taylor Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon Whiskey ...

Theres a fascinating story behind the latest limited edition from Buffalo Traces Col. E. H. Taylor, Jr. Collection. It starts with a tornado and ends up with a very unusual bourbon unusual, even in a family of bourbons that have unique qualities. The story goes a little something like this:

It was a Sunday evening, April 2, 2006, when a severe storm tore through Central Kentucky, damaging two Buffalo Trace Distillery aging warehouses. Fortunately, no one was injured and Warehouse B was empty at the time. However, Warehouse C sustained significant damage to its roof and north brick wall. Warehouse C is one of the most treasured warehouses on property, built by Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. in 1881.

Throughout the strong storm that raged across the Distillery, the bourbon barrels stood strong, never budging from their resting spots. Patiently they waited while the roof and wall repairs took place that summer. The barrels sat exposed to the central Kentucky climate for months as the sun and wind took their toll.

Finally in late 2011, those same barrels were tasted and the bourbon was married into a single batch dubbed Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon.

During the summer of 2006 the sun and weather inevitably contributed to increased evaporation, wood interaction and rich flavors in this bourbon whiskey. The angels share amounted to an astonishingly high 63.9% loss.

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Colonel Eh Taylor Warehouse C Tornado Surviving

This offering is from a selection of 93 special casks that were housed in Buffalo Trace Distillerys landmark Warehouse C. Struck by a massive tornado in April of 2006, the warehouses nearly 24,000 barrels were left exposed to the natural elements. Buffalo Trace decided to bottle these barrels separately, as the sweltering Kentucky heat had accelerated the aging process, creating a distinct flavor.

ABOUT E.H. TAYLOR

E.H. Taylor, Jr. was a visionary in the whiskey world with a mind for distilling that was years ahead of its time. He founded a world class Distillery, made advancements to the industry, and fought for the purity and legitimacy of bourbon gaining him the title of the Father of the Modern Bourbon Industry.

Whiskey Review: Eh Taylor Jr Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

Have you ever bought a bottle out of just sheer curiosity, only for it to become one of the most sought-after bottles on the market today?

Years ago, when I used to do private tastings for friends and family, I ran across the E.H. Taylor line. I started with the Small Batch and Single Barrel and thought it would be fun to buy the others as they were released. I didnt realize at the time that picking up the E.H. Taylor, Jr. Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon and the E.H. Taylor, Jr. Sour Mash at retail would be such a big deal down the road.

Why is this bourbon so exclusive? How did it get its name? Is it all just marketing hype?

In 2006, the Buffalo Trace Distillery experienced a tornado and severe storms resulting in damage to the building Warehouse C. During the time needed to make repairs to the warehouse, these barrels became exposed to the elements affecting the maturation rate and flavor of the aging whiskey. Years later, when sampling the whiskey inside, it turns out the product was surprisingly still good, maybe even great. Buffalo Trace went on to bottle the remaining bourbon and put it on the market.

So hows a $1,000 a glass bourbon?

Color: Medium Amber

Nose: I initially notice sour cherries, leather, and dried fruit . Make me think of summer days when I was young helping my neighbor bail hay. Musty in a good way.

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Eh Taylor Warehouse C

Know how to listen and you will profit even from those who talk badly Plutarch

With the might of meteorological forces due to increase in both severity and frequency, Im sure it would surprise very few bourbon enthusiasts to see emulations of E.H. Taylors vaunted Tornado Surviving expression hit the market. What did, however, come as a surprise was that in the beginning of last year Buffalo Trace announced a sequel-of-sorts to that offering and the subject of todays review: E.H. Taylor Warehouse C.

Lets take a step back for a moment and note that Buffalo Trace is often derided for their opportunistic deployment of line extensions and the term limited edition. Those who bemoan the tactics typically focus their umbrage on the fact that given the popularity of their core brands Buffalo Trace would do well to simply make more of their existing expressions. For what its worth, the E.H. Taylor lineup is as popular as any of their others, but it distinguishes itself in that, since it began in 2011, it has featured an annual limited release.

The 2021 edition of Warehouse C has not survived any unexpected acts of nature, though it did garner a whirlwind of interest from enthusiasts when it was first released so much so that the secondary value of this bottle is currently in the exact same ballpark as its forebear, despite the fact they merely share the same general aging location.

Eh Taylor Warehouse C Review

Is EH TAYLOR Tornado Survivor Worth More Than a Used Car?

Color: Golden amber.

On the nose: Stewed rainier cherries leap out of the glass at first, ensconced in pie-like graham cracker notes, before being joined by vanilla pods, heavy cream, and star anise. Theres a leafy green beetroot note that plucks up at times throughout the nosing experience which serves as an interesting interruption more than an unwelcome one. At last, the cinnamon one expects when aromas of pie and vanilla are in the mix finds its way after repeat swirls and its joined by a touch of milk chocolate. I should remark that all of those sweet aromas are curt and dont indicate an overly sweet palate.

In the mouth: Upon first sip Im struck by the texture and finish more than the flavors. It has a great lingering mouthfeel and a restrained but prominent sizzle on the finish. As for the flavor, it favors the pronounced cherry notes of the nose and supplements that with vanilla ice cream. Between the effervescent texture/finish and the flavor combination it reminded me of a vanilla float with cherry cola. Again, that isnt to say it was decadent in its sweetness the presence of those flavors is unmistakable, but they arent grounded by much more than sweetness and some oak. The milk chocolate is absent but its replaced by an enigmatic faint spearmint note that keeps me going back to the glass.

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